The Non-Diet Approach to Health & Life | Special Guest Interview with Lauren Fowler

Have you ever followed someone on Instagram or Facebook and feel like you really do know them, but yet you have never met and they probably don’t anything about you?

Yes?  - Well I hope so as otherwise I’m going to sound like a crazy social media stalker!! ;) ;)

My special guest this week is Lauren Fowler. Lauren is a Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist from the United States. I have been following Lauren on instagram for sometime and really love reading her blog. I asked Lauren to take part in our series because she shares an awesome message. You can instantly tell she writes from the heart to help others incorporate intuitive eating, self-love and mindfulness into their life.

Thankfully she said YES!

Psst – If you are reading this blog for the first time and wondering what this interview series is all about, head to our intro on the non-diet approach to health HERE FIRST. Otherwise, just keep reading on :)

Now. Let’s learn more about Lauren….

lauren fowlerWas there one moment you decided you would work in nutrition – and more importantly start to use a non-diet approach to health?

Through my own personal struggles with food, I realized that building a healthy mindset with food is just as important than what we eat. When I realized that health goes beyond a “perfect” diet and includes mental, emotional, social, and spiritual health as well, I knew I had to encourage a non-diet approach for my clients as well.

What does a positive body image mean to you?

Positive body image means connecting to and being IN my body. When I am able to be present in my body, I can recognize its needs and desires, like hunger, fullness, satisfaction. I also notice what type of movement I’m craving, when I need more rest, and other cues from my body.

Body image means appreciating what my body can do, as well as challenging our culture’s body and beauty ideals. It’s recognizing that size diversity is a very real and wonderful thing. By focusing on building healthy habits, I can develop health and body positivity, and I allow my weight to naturally settle where it wants to.

A big part of mindfulness and avoiding a dieting mentality is self-love and nurturing. Can you tell our SOL friends your favourite way to nurture yourself?

Yes! I strongly believe in developing self-care practices. Some of my favorites are a daily meditation practice, some form of movement (typically yoga or anything outdoors), and journaling.

The key is to remember that these are just practices, and you can find what works best for you. I started off with just one minute of meditation a day, and now, I typically do 10-15 minutes in the morning. Find a few things you can add to your daily routine to build this self-love.

Why is it that diets don’t work for many people long term?

why diets don't work

image credit: laurenfowler.co

On a physical level, our bodies don’t respond well to deprivation. Over time, our body realizes it’s not getting the energy it needs to survive. When we’re physically deprived, we’re more likely to eat fast and crave high fat and high sugar foods.

Mentally, putting a food off-limits makes it crave it more. After weeks of dieting, we feel like we deserve it for being “so good.” Then, we often binge on that food, feel guilty, and the diet cycle starts over.

By giving ourselves permission to eat whatever you want, you can actually tune into what your body wants.

Do you ever struggle with ‘mindless eating’ yourself? What strategies help you?

Everyone does sometimes! I believe emotional eating isn’t a bad thing because while we eat for fuel, we also eat for pleasure. I don’t eat chocolate for energy but because I enjoy it.

To build mindful eating skills, find one meal a day when you can sit down with your meal and enjoy it. Slow down your eating, breathe, and really enjoy your meal. Remove the distractions for this meal – computer, TV, phone – and just focus on eating.

Who do you respect (or who is a trailblazer) in the non-dieting approach to health field?

what is normal eatingI always think of Evelyn Tribole & Elyse Resch who wrote the book Intuitive Eating.

I also love Linda Bacon who wrote Health at Every Size and Geneen Roth’s books that look at the emotional and spiritual aspects of food.

 

 


What’s one thing we don’t know about you?

I’ve been skydiving twice now and dying to go again! It was such a rush of energy, and last time, I caught a sunset on the way down.

Last one….What are you working on in 2015 – what exciting things should we look out for?

I’ve launched a new ebook – Hips, Hunger, and the Pursuit of Healing – with a blogger and eating disorder therapist. We wrote it together to share our lessons on intuitive eating and body image.

We’re thrilled to share our favorite tips, exercises, and personal stories on intuitive eating and body image.

BIG THANKS TO LAUREN FOR AGREEING TO TAKE PART IN THIS SERIES!!

 

Want to know more about our special guest?

lauren fowlerLauren Fowler is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist who helps women rediscover a healthy relationship with food and their bodies. She works with clients with eating disorders and disordered eating to help them eat intuitively, love their bodies, and trust themselves. She also blogs and writes ebooks on her site, including the 30-Day Mindful Eating Challenge and Hips, Hunger, and the Pursuit of Healing.

For more info please check out Lauren’s website HERE.


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2 thoughts on “The Non-Diet Approach to Health & Life | Special Guest Interview with Lauren Fowler

  1. Pingback: The non-diet approach to health & life | Guest Interview With Magnus Fridh | SOL nutrition blog

  2. Pingback: The non-diet approach to health & life | Guest Interview with Sarah Harry |SOL nutrition blog

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